What Does ATP Hygiene Monitoring Tell Us About Dirty and Clean Surfaces in the Postharvest Produce Environment?

Title of Internship Talk

What Does ATP Hygiene Monitoring Tell Us About Dirty and Clean Surfaces in the Postharvest Produce Environment?

Student Information

Gauri Arora

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Primary Mentor

Dr. Jovana Kovacevic; Mrs. Stephanie Brown

Mentor Organization

Oregon State University Food Innovation Center

Internship Title

Microbiology Laboratory Intern

Internship Dates

Summer 2022

Presentation Date

8-11-2022

Talk Description

Introduction: The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was enacted in 2011 to emphasize the prevention of foodborne illnesses in the food system. Within FSMA, the Produce Safety Rule (PSR) was the first rule with federal regulatory standards established for produce activities. One of the major components of the PSR is cleaning and sanitation in produce handling environments. To accommodate a wide variety of operations and equipment used, the regulation uses general terms for cleaning and sanitizing requirements, such as "adequately cleaned..." and "...when necessary and appropriate, sanitize...", which can be left to interpretation as to what constitutes adequately cleaned surfaces. Within the food industry, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence assay can be used to verify surface cleanliness, based on the reactivity of the luciferin-luciferase reagent with any ATP residue, resulting in light being emitted and measuring the presence of organic matter. ATP luminometer companies have set general thresholds of relative light unit (RLU) requirements, but there is lack of data on what these values mean in practice within different produce commodities and their environments.

What Does ATP Hygiene Monitoring Tell Us About Dirty and Clean Surfaces in the Postharvest Produce Environment?

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